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Glycemic Index


Glycemic Index

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Although some people might differ with me, I personally do not see a contradiction between counting carbs and the Glycemic Index(GI). They both set an example of healthy or good (complex) carbs and unhealthy or bad (simple) carbs. One does it by watching the carb count and subtracting fiber and sugar alcohols and the other rates carbohydrates by a numbering system (0-100). The lower the number, the better the carb, the higher the number, the worse the carb. Both systems agree that low carbs (complex carbs) do not impact the sugar level in your blood as quickly and do not make your blood level spike and drop. The contrary is true of high carbs (simple carbs), which do, thus causing you to get hungry and desire more food.

For a Diabetic, it is not just a matter of getting hungry and eating more, but it can be very dangerous to have spikes as it can lead to many serious diabetic complications such as problems with their eye sight, amputations of toes, feet, or limbs, as well as heart attack, high blood pressure, strokes, high cholesterol and high triglycerides, and if the level drops too fast or too low, can cause a Diabetic coma or death. This by the way most of these problems are also true for people who are not Diabetic.

Although there are some differences in the Glycemic Diet and the Low Carb program, I simply take the best from both worlds. In fairness to the GI Diet, it does encourage less meat (fats), more fruits, and more high fiber whole grain cereals, etc.

Both programs agree that too may carbs per day causes a continuous and overproduction of insulin, thus making cells less receptive and leading to insulin resistance, which thereby stops the glucose from being delivered to the muscle and liver cells and storing the fat on our bodies.

Since low-GI carbs take awhile to digest that means they're almost always high-fiber foods.

Good carbs include three huge groups:

1) Most fruits and vegetables;

2) 100 percent whole-grain cereals, breads, crackers, whole-wheat pasta and couscous, brown and wild rice;

3) Beans, lentils and other legumes.


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WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE GLYCEMIC INDEX AND THE GLYCEMIC LOAD?

The GI only provides information on how rapidly a carb is converted to blood sugar. It has nothing to do with the quantity of the carbs you consume. The Glycemic Load takes into consideration both elements, the speed the food is converted into blood sugar and the quantity of the carbs eaten.

If you would rather go by the GI (the number given to any one food), simply use this method of calculating: Take the number the food is given by the GI and multiply it by the number of carbs, always located on the nutrition guide on the package. Divide your answer by 100 and you will get the Glycemic Load. Always make sure to go by “serving size” which is also on the nutrition guide. The following is a list to follow:

GLYCEMIC INDEX
Low – 55 or less
Medium – 56-69
High – 70 or more

GLYCEMIC LOAD RANGE
Low – 10 or less
Medium – 11-19
High – 20 or more

GLYCEMIC LOAD PER DAY
Low – less then 80
Medium – 81-120

High – 120 or more

High carbs, or a high GL can cause and increase in the risk of heart disease, ovarian, stomach or endometrial cancer, Diabetes, higher LDL (bad) cholesterol, while lowering the HDL (good) cholesterol, and increasing your triglycerides.

Whichever way you decide to count carbs, make sure your foods include the necessary vitamins, minerals and fiber. Lack of fiber can cause IBS (Irritable Bowel Syndrome). Flax Seed is an excellent way to help with this problem (Read the page listed as “Cooking/Medical Facts). Keep within the portion sizes. Remember, the bigger the portion the more it will increase your blood glucose level.

William Brock, ND, has been kind enough to allow me to extract some of his information and his Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load information. I personally liked the way he set up his GI because he makes it easy for people to know if a food is low, medium, or high when it comes to how fast a certain food turns into sugar in our system (which is necessary for Diabetics), but more importantly, his GL (Glycemic Load) has the number we are looking for, because it gives us the complete picture. To find out more information from Mr. Brock, please click on his site.

http://www.drbrocknd.com/pages/7/index.htm


 

GLYCEMIC INDEX

Alfalfa sprouts - Low
Apple - Med
Apricot - Med
Artichoke - Low <15
Asparagus - Low <15
Avocado - Low <15
Baked beans - M/H
Bamboo shoots - Low
Banana - M/H
Bean sprouts - Low
Beets, canned - Med
Black beans - Med
Blackberries - Low
Blueberries - Low
Bock choy - Low
Broccoli - Low <15
Brussel sprouts - Low
Buckwheat - Med
Bulgur wheat - Med
Butternut Squash - Med
Cabbage - Low
Cantaloupe - Low
Carrots - High
Cauliflower - Low <15
Celery - Low <15
Cheese tortellini - Low 50
Cherries - Low
Collards - Low
Corn - High
Cornmeal - High
Couscous - High
Cranberry sauce - High
Croissant - High
Croutons plain - High
Croutons seasoned - High
Cucumber - Low <15
Dates - High
Dinner rolls - High
Egg noodles - High
Eggplant - Low
Endive - Low
English Muffin - High
Figs (raw) - High
Flour, rye - High
Flour, wheat (Enriched/processed - High
Grapes - Med
Grapefruit - Low
Green beans - Low
Grits - High
Guava - Med
Hominy - Med
Honeydew - Low
Hummus - Low
Ice Cream, low fat - Low 50
Kale - Low
Kashi - Med
Kidney beans - Med
Kiwi fruit - Low
Leeks - Low
Lemon/Lime - Med
Lentils - Med
Lettuce - Low
Lima beans - Med
Macaroni - Med
Macaroni (Dreamfield) - Low
Mango - M/H
Millet - High
Muffins, blueberry - High
Mushrooms - Low
Mustard greens - Low
Navy beans - Med
Nectarine - Med
Noodles - Med
Oatmeal - Med
Oat bran - High
Okra - Low
Orange - Med
Onion - Low
Pancakes - High
Parsley - Low
Parsnips - High
Papaya - High
Pasta - Med
Pears - Low
Peas, green - Med
Peach - Low
Pickles, dill - Low
Pickles, sweet - High
Pineapple - Low
Pita pocket - High
Plum - Low
Poi - High
Popcorn Very - High
Potato, baked - Very High
Potato, mashed - Very High
Potato, red, new - Med
Prunes - Med
Radish - Low
Raisins - High
Raspberries - Low
Rice, brown - M/H
Rice cakes, plain - Very High
Salsa - Low
Sauerkraut - Low
Snow peas - Low
Spaghetti, wheat - M/H
Spinach - Low
Strawberries - Low
Stuffing - High
Summer squash - Med
Sweet potato - M/H
Taco shell - Med
Tangerine - Med
Tomato - Low
Tortilla, corn - Med
Tortilla, flour - High
Turnip greens - Low
Turnip root - Low
Swiss chard - Low
Waffles - High
Watermelon - Med
Yam - M/H
Zucchini - Low
Pinto beans - Med
Cauliflower - Low
Refried beans - Med
Chili pepper - Low
White beans - Med
Bagel, plain - High
Bagel, sweet - High
Biscuit - High
Bread crumbs - High
Bread sticks - High
Bread, white - High
Bread, wheat - High
Bread, low cal - High
Bread, rye - High
Bread, pumpernickel - High
Bread, French - High
Buns - High
Buns, reduced cal - High
Cornbread - High


Glycemic Load

 

  • Avocado <1
  • Cheese <1
  • Chicken <1
  • Eggs <1
  • Fish <1
  • Red meat <1
  • Strawberries (120 grams) 1
  • Carrots (1/2 cup cooked) 1.5
  • Peach (1 fresh) 3
  • Green peas (80 grams) 3
  • Grapefruit (120 grams) 3
  • Cashew Nuts (50 grams) 3
  • Beetroot (60 grams, canned) 3.2
  • Oranges (120 grams, raw) 5
  • Split peas, yellow (90 grams, boiled) 5.2
  • Apples (120 grams) 6
  • Rye Kernel Bread – Pumpernickel (30 grams) 6
  • Split peas (150 grams, boiled) 6
  • Kiwi Fruit (120 grams) 6
  • Sucrose - Table Sugar - (10 grams) 6.5
  • Parsnips (75 grams, boiled) 7.5
  • Lentils (1/2 cup cooked) 8
  • Mango (120 grams, raw) 8
  • Grapes (120 grams, green) 8
  • Sweet potato (80 grams, peeled, boiled) 8.6
  • Bread (whole wheat, 1 slice) 9.6
  • Chocolate (50 grams milk chocolate) 10.5
  • Pasta - Tortellini, cheese (180 grams, cooked) 10.5
  • Pasta – Ravioli, meat-filled (220 grams, cooked) 11.7
  • Apple juice (250 ml) 12
  • Parsnip (80 grams) 12
  • Baked potato (medium) 14
  • Coca Cola (250 ml) 15
  • Bread- whole grain (2 slices) 15
  • Pasta – Vermicelli (180 grams, cooked) 15.7
  • Brown Rice (cooked, 1/2 cup) 16
  • Potato (150 grams, mashed) 17
  • Banana (1 medium) 17.6
  • Pasta – Fettucini (180 grams, cooked) 18.2
  • Grapefruit juice (250 ml, unsweetened) 20
  • Bread – white (2 slices) 22
  • Fanta (250 ml) 23
  • Spaghetti (white, cooked, 1 cup) 23
  • Bagel (70 grams) 25
  • White rice (cooked, 1 cup) 26
  • Soft drink (375 ml) 34.7
  • French Fries (120 grams, small cut) 36.7
  • Lucozade (250 ml) 40
  • Dates (60 grams, dried) 42
  • Potato (1 baked) 45

    For more information and list of foods and their Glycemic Index, please refer to: Click on G.I. Listing.


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